Landscape

Cultivating A Green Thumb With Shotwell Floral

Shotwell Floral

We just have to get a little dirt on our hands first. To help us do just that, we called on local expert J.D. Shotwell of Shotwell Floral to teach us everything we need to know about late summer gardening.

Photos by Hillary Ehlen
HEADSHOT BY J. Alan Paul Photography
Additional photos provided by Shotwell Floral

Everyone knows someone with a green thumb. Right now, they are probably tending their garden or sipping iced tea in their sunroom, surrounded by thriving houseplants. Many of us aspire to become like this person. Although it is already August, there is still time to cultivate our own green thumbs. We just have to get a little dirt on our hands first. To help us do just that, we called on local expert J.D. Shotwell of Shotwell Floral to teach us everything we need to know about late summer gardening.

Shotwell Floral
J.D. SHOTWELL – Owner, Shotwell Floral & Greenhouse

LATE BLOOMS

One common misconception is that summer ends when we can’t go shopping without seeing back-to-school ads. However, the last day of summer isn’t until September 22 this year, which means that we still have plenty of time to enjoy our gardens. Luckily, Shotwell knows of some late-blooming plants that are seasonally appropriate.

Shotwell Floral
Bridal veil requires plenty of sunlight.
Shotwell Floral
Hibiscus Tree

EASY TRANSITIONS

Some outdoor plants that flourish in the late summer can survive indoors during the winter, if cared for properly. These include bridal veil, Swedish ivy, hibiscus trees and hibiscus hybrids. Placing these plants in containers or hanging planters with holes for drainage eases the transition from outdoors to indoors because it allows you to move the plant as needed, depending on the position of the sun. Exposing your plant to the correct amount of sunlight is the most important contributing factor to ensuring your plant’s indoor survival.

Shotwell Floral
Swedish ivy needs to be placed in the morning sun. Afternoon sunlight will burn the Swedish ivy’s bright leaves.
Shotwell Floral
To freshen up your flower beds, Shotwell suggests garden mums, which are a perennial that will grow back each year.
Shotwell Floral
Hibiscus Hybrid, Hibiscuses require at least six hours of sunlight a day.

POPULAR HOUSE PLANTS

Rather than bringing your outdoor plants inside over the winter, another alternative is to acquire house plants. If you’re feeling ambitious, you may even want to maintain an outdoor garden as well as greenery that you can enjoy indoors year-round. To help you pick the perfect house plant, we’ve curated a collection of popular options personally recommended by Shotwell.

Shotwell Floral

Shotwell Floral
Succulents
Shotwell Floral
Snake Plant
Shotwell Floral
Fiddle Leaf Fig
Shotwell Floral
Moss
Shotwell Floral
Pothos
Shotwell Floral
Air Plants

Shotwell Floral

Shotwell Floral
Crotos

“Perennials, you can cut back down to the ground because they’re going to regrow off of the root system. After the foliage freezes, you can cut it off.”

SPRING CLEANING

How do you determine when it is time to stop watering your outdoor plants? Shotwell suggests that gardeners continue to water their perennials, or plants that live for more than two years, right up until the first freeze. “You just want to take care of them until they die off, so they can pull those extra nutrients from the plant itself back into the root system,” Shotwell said. This fortifies the roots for the winter and encourages the plant to grow back stronger the following year.

 

When it comes to removing dried leaves and stems, Shotwell prefers to clean his garden in the fall after the first big freeze when everything starts dying off because it makes his yard look neat and tidy when the snow starts to melt. Contrastingly, some people with gardens prefer spring cleaning. This allows the dried stems and leaves to act as insulation for the root systems while the ground is covered in snow. “There’s no right or wrong, just personal preference,” Shotwell explained. However, he emphasized that you should not try to cut down shrubs because they don’t require any preparation for the winter months.

Shotwell Floral

4000 40th St. S, Fargo
701-356-9377
shotwellflorist.com
Air Plants

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